Southern Afternoon

Rule Number one on a southern afternoon, or any time after noon…

” Always stick around for one more drink. That’s when things happen. That’s when you find out everything you want to know.”

—  John Berendt, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

  • 1.5 oz Bulleit Bourbon
  • .5 oz Fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
  • 2 Fresh raspberries
  • Regan’s Orange Bitters

Muddle raspberries at the bottom of a shaker. Add Bulleit, grapefruit juice, bitters and ice. Shake well. Fine strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with a grapefruit peel.

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Limited Addiction

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I chose Greenhook Ginsmiths American Dry Gin as the base for this cocktail because of its sweet elderflower, cinnamon, and peppery juniper notes. I then infused the gin with bold, bright, tangy hibiscus. Next I added ripe cherry juice and spiced orange liqueur. To finish off the drink I floated a thin layer of light anise, chocolate and coffee found in Amaro Ciociaro which ultimately makes for a delightful treat.

  • 1.5 oz Hibiscus infused Greenhook Ginsmiths American Dry Gin
  • 1/4 oz Amaro Ciociaro
  • 1/2 oz Benedictine
  • 1/2 oz cherry juice
  • 2 dashs Regans orange bitters
  • Bar spoon agave syrup

Add everything but the Amaro Ciociaro into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Fine strain into a chilled coupe glass. Using the back of a bar spoon, carefully float half an ounce of Amaro Ciociaro on top. Garnish with a blood orange peel. Enjoy.

Hibiscus infused Greenhook Ginsmiths American Dry Gin

Put a handful of hibiscus leaves into a bottle of Greenhook Ginsmiths American Dry Gin. Put the top back on and shake. Wait three hours if using fresh hibiscus or five hours if using dried hibiscus. Fine strain hibiscus leaves out. Put a cinnamon stick in, shake and leave for 24 hours.

Sloane Square

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I put three of my favorite spirits together for this cocktail. Clenynlish 14 year old scotch with its zesty mandarin, fiery oak, long lingering finish pairs nicely with Fortaleza Reposado’s deep butterscotch and cinnamon spice. Benedictine offers a wealth of spices including cardamom, cloves, spicy toffee and orange notes. This cocktail should be sipped slowly and savored.

  • 2 oz Clenynlish 14 year old Single Malt Scotch
  • 3/4 oz Fortaleza Reposado
  • .5 Benedictine Liqueur
  • 2-3 dashs Regans orange bitters

Stir all ingredients in a beaker and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

Lotus

I wanted to make an orange colored seasonal cocktail that wasn’t your typical bourbon, apple and cinnamon safe concoction. This cocktail has apple, cinnamon flavors but they are experienced in a completely different way. It’s light, delicate and crisp.

To me; Vida Mezcal has distinct flavors of cinnamon, honey, ginger, citrus, and a hint of smoked peppers.  Toped with Lustau Palo Cortado Sherry that brings out apricot, smoked orange and date notes. Each flavor is balanced by the crisp dryness in apples and kiwi’s add a layer of surprise.

  • 2 oz Del Maguey Vida Mezcal
  • .75 oz Lustau Palo Cortado Sherry
  • .5 Barenjager Honey Liqueur
  • 3 slices of Apples and Kiwis
  • Dash Regan’s Orange Bitters
  • Lemon twist

Muddle apple and kiwi slices with Barenjager Honey Liqueur in the bottom of a beaker. Add remaining ingredients and ice. Stir. Fine strain into a chilled coupe glass.  Garnish with a lemon twist.

Brisk Breeze


Something changes in the air when fall is upon us in San Francisco. It’s not so much a day or a time for me, it’s always been a feeling. Fall is unexpected and has always been a moment of surprise. It happened this year at the ballpark during batting practice. I was standing on the field in my daisy dukes, just soaking up the sun and watching the guys when a cold guest of wind swept through the ballpark. It left goose bumps on my arms. One of the coaches stopped mid sentence and changed his entire batting speech to describe fall wind. He went into depth on how the wind shifts in the fall to affects pitches, batting and the ball in mid-air. That was the moment I knew fall had officially begun.

My favorite part of fall is pumpkins. I always have a sugar pumpkin on hand for pie and pumpkin pie ready for football games. When thinking about putting pumpkin into a cocktail everyone I asked seemed skeptical. With a big, blushy, excited smile I would ask, “ I am going to make pumpkin infused bourbon. What do you think?” And all I got were blank stares. I have to admit this recipe took a few trial and errors. I didn’t mind because my entire house smelled like pumpkin pie for a whole week, it was heavenly.

This cocktail is pretty straightforward. I chose George Dickel number 12 for it’s layers of spicy toffee, caramel, walnut and fall spices. Trust me on this one; don’t consider any other whisky just go for the Dickel.

  • 2 oz Pumpkin infused George Dickel no. 12
  • 1/2 oz Amaro Nonino
  • 2 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters
  • 1 barspoon spiced demerara syrup

Combine all ingredients in a beaker with ice. Stir well. Fine strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with a flamed orange peel. Enjoy.

Spiced Demerara Syrup

  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 cloves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 vanilla bean split.

Combine all ingredients. Bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer until liquid is reduced by half. Let cool and fine strain into an airtight container.

Pumpkin Infused Bourbon

  • ¼ cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons pure cane sorghum syrup
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ginger
  • And of course a bottle of George Dickel no. 12

Preheat a convection oven to 400 degrees. Cut pumpkin into one-inch pieces lengthwise. Place pumpkin on a cookie sheet. Combine all ingredients. If the honey is too cold making it hard to stir – place the container in your microwave for twenty seconds. Baste pumpkin slices with mixture. Let cook for about an hour or until pumpkin becomes tender. Turn pumpkin pieces halfway though and baste the other side. Place pumpkin pieces into an airtight container; pour 750 ml George Dickel over pumpkins. Be careful to make sure all of pumpkin surfaces are submerged in alcohol. Store in a dark place for two weeks.